Meanderings

S&B X Luke Edward Hall

[S&B X Luke Edward Hall]

Issue #94
In time for the Holiday season, we're excited to announce the launch of our newest collaboration with artist and designer Luke Edward Hall. Bringing his whimsical aesthetic and love for ancient history to the rustic and elegant charm that is S&B, these pieces of art remind us of the way line creates both structure and space, but can also be undeniably emotional.

Hand painted on luxurious 100% Italian linen, the Antinous I and Antinous II tablecloths feature fluid brushstrokes of busts reminiscent of emperors, heroes and lost lovers from centuries long gone. They are a tribute to one of the first expressions of beauty found in the human form.


Love,

S&B


[Introducing the Collection]






[To View The Full Collection Click Here]


[At Home And At The Table With Luke Edward Hall]

It was a wonderful experience working with Luke to create these table linens. He graciously opened the doors to his carefully considered, yet bold Camden flat to shoot the collaboration. Somewhere in between the packing, unpacking and styling we were able to ask Luke all the questions we had been wondering about over the past few months. 

Q.

What was the inspiration or creative process behind the design for these tablecloths and napkins?

A.
My work is often inspired by stories and I've been a fan of Ancient Greek and Roman art, architecture, myths and legends since childhood. I often end up using Greek and Roman motifs in my work (hence the Ionic columns on the napkins). The figure on the tablecloths is Antinous, a Greek lover of Hadrian. I've been drawing him for years because his story is so fascinating. Following Antinous' untimely and mysterious death, Hadrian was torn apart by grief. He deified Antinous and founded an organized cult devoted to his worship - temples were built in his name, as well as a city at the site of his death. Since then Antinous has grown to become a sort of icon. It's all rather tragic but very romantic.


Q.
How would you describe your aesthetic?

A.
I'd say my colourful aesthetic is informed by a love of history, an appreciation of beauty and a sense of playfulness. As I mentioned I'm inspired by stories, especially myths, legends and tales from folklore. I'm a romantic at heart, quite nostalgic, and I suppose my drawings, fabrics, ceramics, interiors - they're all about telling stories.


Q.
Who is your design hero?

A.
I like looking at rooms by interior designers from the past - David Hicks, Madeleine Castaing, John Fowler, Dorothy Draper. I'm a huge Fornasetti fan and I love the Bloomsbury Group too - not just for their aesthetic but their ethos too. United by a belief that fine art should inhabit everyday spaces, the 'Bloomsberries' believed that the same attention should be lavished on the design of carpets or fire-grates, as had traditionally been paid to the design of a painting or sculpture.


Q.
What brought you to London originally?

A.
I moved to London when I was 18 to study at Central Saint Martins. After my foundation course I went on to study menswear fashion design. I was selling antiques whilst at university and I worked for an interior designer after graduating.


Q.
What was the moment you decided to really become a brand of your own? What has that experience been like?

A.
When I was at sixth form college I used to design and piece together a fanzine every few months. My friends contributed photographs, drawings and stories and my dad did the photocopying. After moving to London I began painting plain white t-shirts and selling them on Brick Lane and whilst in my first year at Saint Martins I made outfits for one of my favourite pop stars in my spare time. I suppose I’ve been working at my own ‘brand’ for a long time – it has always felt very natural. I’ve been designing things, making things, and selling things for over a decade now.


Q.
We’ve always believed creativity never happens in a vacuum? Who is the person/are the people who sound board your ideas?

A.
My partner Duncan Campbell (of Campbell-Rey). He is a creative director and designs furniture. Every day we talk about our various projects, which are similar in some ways but also quite different. We can always rely on each other for good advice!


Q.
Your art is bold and unapologetic - what are the ways you’ve seen your own style evolve in the last few years?

A.
Since setting up my studio in the autumn of 2015, I’ve had the opportunity to work on a lot of very different, wonderful jobs – jobs that I could never have predicted or dreamed about doing. I’ve seen my style evolve with each new project, but I hope all of the things that I do have a strong sense of ‘me’ running through them.


Q.
What are your favourite places in London that you go to for inspiration?
 
A.
Sir John Sloane’s Museum, all the interiors and antique shops on Pimlico Road, the British Museum, my favourite restaurants.


Q.
In your opinion, what makes for a great dinner party and who is on your all time list of people to invite?

A.
I don’t think you need a lot – good friends, good food, good wine. Nice, soft lighting! To my dream dinner party I’d invite a mix of friends and some special guests (several are dead I’m afraid): David Hockney, Cecil Beaton, Rex Whistler, the Marchesa Luisa Casati, Peggy Guggenheim, Donna Tartt, Ruth Rogers…


Q.
There has always been a strong connection between food and art. Do you cook at all? If so, what is a favourite recipe for when friends and family come over?

A.
I love cooking. I find it very relaxing after a long day and my ideal Sunday would be spent at home, reading the newspapers and cooking with Duncan. I draw a lot of food too and for me food is very evocative of places and people… A favourite dish we like to make is a simple crab linguine with lots of garlic, chilli and lemon. We have a fantastic greengrocer down the road from us so often we’ll just wander over and see what looks good.


Q.
Colours are such an important element to everything you do, is there a palette at the moment you find yourself irresistibly drawn to? Or perhaps a colour you could never live without?

A.
I couldn’t live without green – I love all its shades. For a while now I’ve been really into 1970s colour palettes – deep, rich browns mixed with tangerine and fuschia. Grey is not for me. So cold and boring and sad.


Q.
Other than your beautiful tablecloths and napkins, what’s your favourite item at S&B?

A.
I love the Shrimps powder pink tablecloth with its faux fur trim – outrageously fun. You can’t go wrong with Astier de Villatte’s beautiful ceramics either.
 
Q.
Where are the places you love travelling to in winter?

A.
Venice – we visit every December. I adore Venice and it’s super special in winter, when the city is crisp and cold and quiet and there’s mist clinging to the canals. When we’re there, every day starts the same, with pistachio croissants and cappuccino at Quadri on Piazza San Marco.


Q.
And finally, what should we keep an eye out for in 2018 from Luke Edward Hall?

A.
A pop-up café in February (perhaps!), a small exhibition of drawings in April and several new collaborations – I’ve been working on a bunch of things from rugby shirts to gold jewellery.


[The Launch Party] 

Under the twinkling fairy lights of Clarendon Cross we opened our doors and hosted our collaboration launch amidst dear friends and family. Below are just a few snapshots of the night.

L - R: Caroline Weiland, Seb Bishop & Luke Edward Hall

L - R: Tamara Mennell, Harriet Guppy, Matthew Atlay, Callum Galloway, Jonny Whiting, Barbara Bentini, Angelo Maccaferri, Nathan Rollinson, Rosalind Alan, Allan Peters, Seb Bishop, Charles Worthington

L - R: Laura Jackson, Arthur Guinness, Alice Levine

L - R: Nathaniel Willis, Wouter Witvoet, Dr. Sam Bunting, Africa Chilvers, Penelope Chilvers, Rene MacDonald